CFP: Monsters and Monstrosity in 21st-Century Film and Television

Monsters and Monstrosity in 21st-Century Film and Television Cristina Artenie (Universitas Press) and Ashley Szanter (Weber State University) Starting from the premise that monsters/monstrosity allow for the (dis)placement of anxieties that contemporary social mores do not otherwise sanction in the public space, editors Artenie and Szanter seek original essays for an edited collection on manifestations... Continue Reading →

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CFP: Fan Phenomena: The Twilight Saga

Chapter proposals for the next edition in the Fan Phenomena series, "Fan Phenomena: The Twilight Saga" are still being sought in several key areas. The Fan Phenomena books explore the greatest pop culture stories of our time. The Twilight Saga’s enduring popularity in literature, movies, graphic novels and short films makes it the perfect addition... Continue Reading →

CFP: Hammer Film Productions: A Laboratory for Modern Horror

June 10-12, 2015. Organizing committee: Gilles Menegaldo, Université de Poitiers, gilles.menegaldo@univ-poitiers.fr ; Anne-Marie Paquet-Deyris, Université Paris Ouest,, apaquet-deyris@u-paris10.fr, Mélanie Boissonneau, Université Paris 3/IRCAV, boissonneau.m@gmail.com Venues: Wednesday 10 June : Université Paris Ouest Nanterre, Thursday 11 June : Université Paris 3- Sorbonne Nouvelle, Censier Center, Friday 12 June: Cité Internationale, Fondation Lucien Paye The recent re-edition... Continue Reading →

From Deerstalker Hat to Black Wool Overcoat: Timelessness in Sherlock Holmes’ Speculative Stories and Drama

Interesting look at Sherlock and how it relates to the Conan Doyle stories. I have a large section in Chapter One on the trope of the great detective as an example of sustained adaptation leading to myth-making. I hadn’t considered “timelessness” as a quality that participates in this process before now. Definitely something to consider.

The Spectatorial

This review contains spoilers.

BBC’s Sherlock is  my favorite TV series. The 2012 reboot of the Victorian detective solving mysterious crimes retains the curious aura of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s story. Brain-twisting crime plots, breathtaking adventures, devilish Moriarty, eccentric yet intelligent Sherlock—all of the exciting elements that led to the success of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes are contained in the British TV series. After replacing Sherlock’s smoking pipe with a nicotine patch, how did the producers of the critically acclaimed show manage to preserve the enigmatic quality of 20th century speculative fiction in 21st century TV adaptation?

There is one thing that does not change over time in the franchise— Sherlock’s heroic figure!

The detective and his super-brain solves mysteries that would seem impossible to solve to common brains. Despite the fact that the fiction is strictly confined to the Victorian period and contains strong Victorian moral discourse…

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CFP: The Story of Memory Conference

The Story of Memory Conference: Exploring New Perspectives on the Relationship between Storytelling and Memory in the Twenty-First Century The University of Roehampton, UK: 4-5 September, 2014 Invited speakers include: Paul Bloom (Psychology and Cognitive Science, Yale); Suzanne Corkin (Neuroscience, MIT); Mark Currie (English Literature, QMUL); Asifa Majid (Psycholinguistics, Radboud); Martijn Meeter (Cognitive Psychology, Vrije... Continue Reading →

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