Call For Papers: Transnational Monstrosity in Popular Culture

Saturday 3rd June 2017, York St John University This one-day conference will explore the figure of the monster in transnational popular culture, across cinema, television, games, comics and literature, as well as through fandoms attached to global monster cultures. It is our intention to bring together researchers to consider how transnational monstrosity is constructed, represented... Continue Reading →

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Monstrously Good Fun with Sheffield Gothic

I've neglected the blog somewhat while I've been in post-submission/pre-Viva limbo. This is mostly because I was lucky enough to be able to switch to full time hours just as I submitted. While I'm still waiting on the Viva, I have kept my hand in academically witch conferences, seminars and academic discussions on social media and... Continue Reading →

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CFP: Monsters and Monstrosity in 21st-Century Film and Television

Monsters and Monstrosity in 21st-Century Film and Television Cristina Artenie (Universitas Press) and Ashley Szanter (Weber State University) Starting from the premise that monsters/monstrosity allow for the (dis)placement of anxieties that contemporary social mores do not otherwise sanction in the public space, editors Artenie and Szanter seek original essays for an edited collection on manifestations... Continue Reading →

OGOM Company of Wolves CFP – Beyond excited to announce this!

Way back in the mists of time, before I started my PhD, I attended a conference at the University of Hertfordshire called Open Graves, Open Minds. I gave a paper on the monstrous female in the Twilight series, ate lunch from a coffin, bought many books and made some friends for life. The Open Graves, Open Minds project has launched the CFP for it’s next conference,The Company of Wolves, and I can’t wait.

Open Graves, Open Minds

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels

OGOM: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans

doreWolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them more closely into our lives.

Our company with wolves has inspired fiction from Ovid, through Perrault and the Grimms’ narrators, to Bram Stoker and Kipling; and, more recently, to Angela Carter, Neil Jordan, Anne Rice, Marcus Sedgwick and Glen Duncan.

The Open Graves, Open Minds Project was initiated in 2010 with the Vampires and the Undead in Modern…

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Top 10 Non-Human Couples

Personally I'd have numbers 10, 9 and 4 much higher up the list but this is the perfect Valentines list for those of us who love the monstrous, the non-human and the other. Can you think of any other couples that you would put on your list? Top 10 Non-Human Couples.

CFP: 12th Global Monsters and the Monstrous

Mechanisms of Monstrosity Friday 25th July  – Sunday 27th July 2014 Mansfield College, Oxford This years Monsters and the Monstrous conference will focus on the mechanisms of monstrosity itself and the forms of othering and difference that cause a society, a culture and a historical moment to label someone or something as monstrous. As such, whilst iconic... Continue Reading →

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