CFP: All about Cinderella: retellings in the cultural imagination

University of Bedfordshire, 9-10 June 2017 Three-hundred and nineteen years since the publication of Charles Perrault’s famous Histories du Temps Passé, the myth of Cinderella remains integral to many current facets of our cultures. Inspired by the University of Bedfordshire’s collection of scripts, books, theatrical memorabilia, designs, ephemera on Cinderella and organised by the Research... Continue Reading →

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CFP: Shakespeare in Modern Popular Culture

International Symposium – Arras, Université d’Artois, FRANCE – June 15-17, 2016 Convenors : Guillaume Winter (Université d’Artois), Vincent Roger (Institut Catholique de Lille), Julie Assouly (Université d’Artois). Symposium organized by Textes & Cultures (Université d’Artois, EA 4028) and Laboratoire Pluridisciplinaire des Sciences de l’Homme et de la Société (Institut Catholique de Lille), under the aegis... Continue Reading →

CFP: Filming Locations: The Fabric of Culture, Myth & Identities in Small Cinemas

We welcome proposals for individual presentations and full panels at the 6th annual international conference dedicated to small cinemas. This year’s edition of the conference will be held in Valletta, Malta. Aimed at academics and media industry professionals, this year’s conference revolves around the broad phenomenon of on-location shooting, but is interested in examining this... Continue Reading →

Academics Wanted: The Supernatural Revamped

Project Overview: Editors Brodman and Doan are seeking original essays for their third of a series of books on legends and images of the supernatural in film, literature and lore from early to modern times and from peoples and cultures around the world. It will be titled The Supernatural Revamped: From Timeworn Legends to 21st Century... Continue Reading →

From Deerstalker Hat to Black Wool Overcoat: Timelessness in Sherlock Holmes’ Speculative Stories and Drama

Interesting look at Sherlock and how it relates to the Conan Doyle stories. I have a large section in Chapter One on the trope of the great detective as an example of sustained adaptation leading to myth-making. I hadn’t considered “timelessness” as a quality that participates in this process before now. Definitely something to consider.

The Spectatorial

This review contains spoilers.

BBC’s Sherlock is  my favorite TV series. The 2012 reboot of the Victorian detective solving mysterious crimes retains the curious aura of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s story. Brain-twisting crime plots, breathtaking adventures, devilish Moriarty, eccentric yet intelligent Sherlock—all of the exciting elements that led to the success of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes are contained in the British TV series. After replacing Sherlock’s smoking pipe with a nicotine patch, how did the producers of the critically acclaimed show manage to preserve the enigmatic quality of 20th century speculative fiction in 21st century TV adaptation?

There is one thing that does not change over time in the franchise— Sherlock’s heroic figure!

The detective and his super-brain solves mysteries that would seem impossible to solve to common brains. Despite the fact that the fiction is strictly confined to the Victorian period and contains strong Victorian moral discourse…

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CFP: Worlds made of Heroes

On the 60th anniversary of the publication of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring 6-7 November 2014 Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto CETAPS – Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies ILCML – Instituto de Literatura Comparada Margarida Losa J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings has been... Continue Reading →

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